Barron’s is bullish on GM and Delta

Barron’s, the weekly publication owned by the Wall Street Journal, in its latest issue mentions several names:

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BULLISH   MENTIONS:

Delta, GM look cheap, with growth potential – While a solid start to earnings season helped push share prices higher earlier this week, some remain deeply discounted, Jack Hough writes in this week’s edition of Barron’s. Despite Delta Air Lines’ (DAL) pessimistic valuation, consolidation has left only a handful of key players and the company faces less competition in key markets than some of its peers, the report adds. Additionally, Goodyear Tire (GT), General Motors (GM) and Lincoln National (LNC) also made the valuation cutoff, Hough says.

General Mills shares fall to ‘bargain territory.’  – General Mills (GIS) has fallen 27% so far this year and while the drop seems deserved because earnings growth has stalled, a closer look suggests sales trends are improving, thanks in part to new-product launches, Jack Hough writes in this week’s edition of Barron’s.

Cruise operators can offer ‘nice’ yields, solid dividend growth – Cruise operators, like Carnival (CCL), Royal Caribbean (RCL) and Norwegian Cruise Line (NCLH), can offer nice yields and solid dividend growth, but economic downturns can pressure payouts, Lawrence Strauss writes in this week’s edition of Barron’s. Another option for investors looking for yield among cruise operators is Walt Disney (DIS), the report added. The entertainment company has a wide variety of holdings, and while its cruise business did not account for a large portion of its $55B of sales last year, it is not insignificant either.

Tech giants may make own custom chips to get edge on one another. – There has been a tension between the world’s largest tech companies- Alphabet (GOOG; GOOGL), Amazon (AMZN), Facebook (FB), Apple (AAPL), Microsoft (MSFT), Baidu (BIDU), and Alibaba (BABA)-and the chip companies they rely on, especially Intel (INTC) and Nvidia (NVDA), Tiernan Ray writes in this week’s edition of Barron’s. While the giants buy massive quantities of Intel’s microprocessors, and Nvidia’s graphics chips, or GPUs, to power their data centers, they are also in an arms race to have the best artificial-intelligence-based machine-learning functions, the report noted, adding that there was always the possibility they may decide to buy fewer off-the-shelf parts and make their own custom chips to get an edge on one another.

 MPL valuations look cheap – Master limited partnerships’ valuations appear cheap, and U.S. energy production is thriving, lifting cash flows for pipeline firms, Darren Fonda writes in this week’s edition of Barron’s. MLP, such as Enterprise Products Partners (EPD), Magellan Midstream Partners (MMP), MPLX (MPLX), Plains All American Pipeline (PAA), could reward investors with higher yields as cash flows rise, Fonda adds.

OTHER MENTIONS

Trump’s tweets politicize U.S. markets, Barron’s says – With President Donald Trump, both politics and business appear personal as he continues his tweets aimed at individual companies, Vito Racanelli writes in this week’s edition of Barron’s. Before and after the election, he consistently aimed arrows at Amazon.com (AMZN) and at the proposed acquisition of Time Warner (TWX) by AT&T (T), the report noted. The President is not alone in singling out companies, Racanelli points out, adding that Democratic candidate Hillary Clinton also took issue with Mylan’s (MYL) price increases for its EpiPen. Maybe it is a sign of the times, but the rise of powerful social-media platforms is the key enabling factor, the report said.


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